Monthly Archives: September 2014

Reach For Recovery’s New Logo

Reach for Recovery’s old logo – the figure of a woman reaching out with her hands – has been the organisational logo for many years. We needed to re-redesign the logo to ensure that it is not gender-specific (as both men and women can get breast cancer) and also to ensure that it inclusive of [...]

The impact of cancer

Receiving a diagnosis of cancer is a major life stressor. Emotional stresses are similar to other major Life Stressors such as a traumatic event, an accident or the loss or death of someone close. Cancer challenges physical and emotional well-being. It will challenge your physical state, your role within your family, your work situation, your [...]

The emotional journey

Breast cancer is a personal and unique experience, one that is often filled with many emotional and psychological challenges such as doubt, shock, anger, guilt, insecurities and indecisiveness. We all have our own unique coping styles and there is no right way to cope with breast cancer. The aim of the information provided is to [...]

An arrow and a star

Mashego Makola is an articulate, strong and determined young woman. She has come a long way since she was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 35, when she describes herself as becoming still, quiet and completely numb, unable to absorb the devastating news. Two years later she is not only a breast cancer [...]

Prescribing medicine doesn’t equal taking medicine

Taking prescribed medicine and completing the full course does not appear to be a problem experienced in South Africa only. A presentation by Yehui Zhu, a nursing sister specialising in breast cancer in Shanghai, revealed that even patients who are on hormonal therapy for breast cancer have a very poor adherence to taking them. The [...]

Supporting young children

The diagnosis of breast cancer can be distressing and difficult to understand for children. It is important to remember that children experience and made sense of their world in an entirely different way. Children’s emotional and behavioural response to the diagnosis is often based on how their parents react to the crisis. They may sense [...]